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    • The Point Artist-Run Centre

      Located on the shores of Alta Lake, close to Rainbow Park, The Point Artist-Run Centre has one of the most stunning views in Whistler. You can sit in the lodge with a cup of tea and slice of fruit pie, with live music playing, local art on the walls, and a million-dollar view of Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains across the lake. You can see why this is a place has attracted pioneers, visitors, and artists for over 60 years.

      Over the last five years “The Point” has grown to hosting two annual festivals, and open house Sundays during the summer months. The Cypress Point Winter Carnival happens in February, with live music, improv theatre, snow sculpting, and fireside jamming, and in August there’s the Flag Stop Theatre & Arts Festival, where you can watch theatre and dance performed on a floating dock. They have a little cash bar serving up the wine and beers called Harrop’s Bar – a throw-back to the original owners of the land before the Farihursts built the lodge and cabins you see today.

      Through the summer months they also have an open house on Sundays, where you’ll find live music, art exhibits, and the Cypress Point Café serving up those famous pies - albeit baked in an oven. They also host writing workshops and retreats, children’s theatre camps, dance performances, and adult theatre mentorship workshops. In the fall you can also join them for their Thanksgiving celebration, which includes a communal traditional dinner with live music.

      Did you know?

      The lodge’s history dates back to the early 1950’s, built by Dick and his second wife, Eunice “Kelly” Fairhurst, it was originally called Cypress Lodge (supposedly named after the yellow cedar trees in the area) and catered to fishing tourists, construction workers, and skiers. They didn’t get electricity until the mid-50’s, but Kelly was well-known for working pie wonders on their wood-burning stove, while Dick’s mother helped to run the tea shop. Dick actually built the first ski lift in Whistler just behind the lodge. The 800-feet rope tow, powered by an old Ford V8 motor, could pull four skiers up at a time. They brought up their children at the lodge where they skated on the lake in winter and swam in summer, hiked for berries, enjoyed sailing regattas and ice breakup derbies – there’s even a story of a coyote stealing their Christmas turkey.

      In 1972 the Fairhursts sold the lodge to the Canadian Youth Hostel. At the time only the Whistler ski area was only three years old and had just three lifts running. They ran the hostel until July, 2010 when they moved location to Cheakamus Crossing, selling the lodge to the Resort Municipality of Whistler. They now rent it out to The Point Artist-Run Centre, a non-profit society who recognized that the community needed an accessible place for artists to exhibit, perform, and collaborate. The Fairhursts really created a sense of community at their lodge, and that’s a legacy that is being passionately upheld today.

      Our Tips

      The Point really is a hidden Whistler gem, go there to relax by the water, take in some art and music, or get inspired to create your own. For more information visit, thepointartists.com.

    • The Alta Lake Station House

      The Alta Lake Station House is a historical building located on the shores of Alta Lake. During warmer months Arts Whistler hosts Art on the Lake Workshops and open house sessions at the house, where the quiet location and incredible views provide the perfect place for creative endeavours. The house can be accessed along the Valley Trail on foot or by bike.

      More from Arts Whistler

    • Art Junction

      Art Junction is an inspiring Canadian contemporary art gallery and custom framing shop. For nearly two decades, they’ve sought out and exhibited some of the region’s top emerging artists, with a focus on artists from the Sea to Sky corridor. The gallery features a diverse collection of art ranging from classic oil landscapes and figurative work, to unique sculptures and mixed media abstracts.

      1068 Millar Creek Road * 604.938.9000 * artjunction.ca

    • Train Wreck

      Among the trees and alongside the roaring Cheakamus River explorers will find an unexpected art gallery. Local graffiti artists have used the mangled wreckage of an old train car as a canvas, creating a unique Whistler art experience deep in the woods.

      In summer of 2016 this area has been connected to the Sea to Sky Trail, making it accessible to hikers, bikers, and other trail users - previous to this it was illegally accessed by walking on the railway tracks (not ideal). Check out this link for a map of how to get there.

      Did You Know?

      The south-bound train derailed in 1956, traveling just a touch to fast on track that was undergoing repair. A local logging company owned by the Valleau family dragged the cars off the tracks and into the forest where you can find them today. This solves the mystery as to why there's no damage to the surrounding trees. For more information on this story visit the Whistler Museum website.

      Our Tip

      If you're an adventurous trail runner or mountain biker, consider taking the Trash Trail to get to the wreck. Don't forget your camera!

    • Mountain ObjectMakers

      Mountain ObjectMakers Cooperative is an artist-driven studio space and collaborative environment for artists working in Object Making. Object Makers include, but are not limited to ceramicists, glass artists, jewellers, sculptors, and flameworkers.

      mountainobjectmakers.com

    • Rainbow Park Cabins

      Visitors to Rainbow Park on the shores of Alta Lake should take a close look at the rustic cabins dotted around the lakeside park. Several of the wooden buildings belonged to Rainbow Lodge, one of the first tourist stops on the railroad in the area which became popular as a fishing and recreational retreat long before Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains had ski lifts.

      The original Rainbow Lodge building was destroyed by fire in the 70s, but the cabins remain to remind visitors of what life was like on the lake in the days before the ski resort.

       

    • 100: Salmon People: Aaron Nelson-Moody • 2009

      This house post, carved in yellow cedar, is integral to the northeast entry of the Day Lodge at Whistler Olympic Park. The carvings include creatures significant to the culture of the Squamish First Nation and represent a traditional offering of salmon to visitors.

    • 101: Day Lodge Doors: Bruce Edmonds • 2009

      These carved yellow cedar doors are inside the Whistler Olympic Park Day Lodge, which was created to host the Nordic events for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. They are a beautiful representation of the culture of the Lil'wat First Nation, one of the Four Host First Nations of the Games.

    • 102: Noshishimak seur moshom: Mothers, Sisters and Grandfathers: Metis 10 Metis Collaborative • 2009

      These plate steel wolves are located along the Olympic Connector trail, 300 metres west of the Whistler Olympic Park Day Lodge. The art is the result of an online collaboration through social media involving Metis artists from across Canada.

    • 103: Vision Earned: Johnnie Abraham – Jonathan Joe • 2009

      Found at the gateway to the Whistler Olympic Park this red cedar sculpture is a metaphor for the athletes who received medals at the Games. Two intertwined eagle feathers rise up out of the wood, with a figure of a Nordic athlete inside each one. The feathers are of symbolic importance as it’s a tradition of the Lil’wat First Nations culture that you earn an eagle feather when you’ve achieved success.

    • 104: Truce Wall: Corinne Hunt, Leo Obstbaum, James Lee • 2010

      The Olympic Truce is an ancient tradition. In modern times this has taken form as a wall within the Athletes' Village. For the 2010 Winter Games, walls with this design were created for Vancouver, Whistler and the United Nations in New York City. The Truce Wall features the design for the Olympic and Paralympic medals, as well as the names of every athlete that competed & committed to the Games movement.

    • 105: tl’aqwa: Copper: Liz Carter • 2009

      The copper shield represents git giving and the woven pattern depicts a First Nations tradition symbolic of the bringing together of people. It hangs on the wall in the Whistler Athletes' Centre at Cheakamus Crossing.

    • 106: From Time Out of Mind: Rosalie Dipcsu • 2009     

      This 2010 Games Art Legacy, at the Whistler Athletes' Centre/Lodge courtyard, mixes the traditional Lil'wat First Nation pictograph with modern sport icons. The artist sought the permission of elders to use the traditional symbols.

    • 107: Dancing Wind: Carey Newman • 2009

      These four mixed media panels are located at the sides of the Whistler Athletes’ Lodge, and convey a sense of movement and represent the dancing wind. Each panel represents a wind direction, an animal, and colour related to an Aboriginal medicine wheel. The north wind is a wolf in white. The east is an eagle in yellow. The south is a frog in red. The west is a bear in black.

    • 108: Running with Spirit: Johnnie Abraham and Jonathan Joe• 2009

      This red cedar carving marks entry to Cheakamus Crossing, site of the 2010 Whistler Athletes' Village. The carving is a welcome figure and part of the 2010 Games Art Legacy. The grizzly bear, a Lil'wat First Nation symbol of strength and speed, is blended with an athlete. The art represents the culturally significant concept of transformation.

    • 109: Last Love: Patrick Sullivan • 2006

      This abstract stone sculpture is located near the train station and Valley Trail entrance to Alpha Lake Park. The sculpture represents the artist’s interest in the tradition of icons used in art, such as Celtic carving. The granite sculpture is finished in various rough to smooth textures, providing a rich tactile experience.

    • 110: Carving Turn: Jill Anholt • 2001

      This sculpture is an abstract representation of a skier’s turn. Its sculptural elements distill a split second of a high speed ski turn, capturing the sense of risk and precariousness a body experiences during downhill racing. The sculpture is integrated into Creekside's World Cup Plaza landscape design, providing dynamic backdrop for awards presentations and entertainment events.

    • 111: Whisky Jack Balance: Douglas Taylor • 2001

      This metal sculpture recounts the story of a Whisky Jack 'sharing' the artist's lunch. The Whisky Jack is a bird commonly found around the restaurants on Whistler Mountain, which boldly “shares” the food of visitors. The bird (with peanut in belly) is counter balanced in this sculpture to move in the wind.

    • 112: lnlyaxan Thunderspirit: Ray Natraoro • 2009

      Thunderspirit is a 2010 Games Art Legacy of the alpine and para-alpine ski venue on Whistler Mountain's Creekside. This welcome figure shows the Thunderbird and features symbols of unity, peace, power, and healing.

    • 113: Lakeside Couple: Joan Baron • 2007

      Lakeside Couple is one of two sculptures that make up Poet’s Pause. Within these giant chairs adults may find their inner child. With an outstanding view to the mountains and position at the lake shore they may also find their voice.

      Poet’s Pause is part of the Valley Trail series of public art projects commissioned by the Resort Municipality of Whistler. Through an open competition and juried selection process, Whistler resident Joan Baron was selected for her creative, multi-faceted Poet’s Pause proposal. The proposal involved sculpture, place making, and creation of an ongoing poetry competition.

      Read more about the Poet’s Pause competition.

    • 114: Lost in Sound: Joan Baron • 2007

      One of the two sculptures that comprise Poet's Pause in Alta Lake Park. An annual poetry competition is held to celebrate the intention of this public art project. The steel chimes inspire interaction and the associated sounds resonate with the lake.

      Poet’s Pause is part of the Valley Trail series of public art projects commissioned by the Resort Municipality of Whistler. Through an open competition and juried selection process, Whistler resident Joan Baron was selected for her creative, multi-faceted Poet’s Pause proposal. The proposal involved sculpture, place making, and creation of an ongoing poetry competition.

      Read more about the Poet’s Pause competition.

    • 115: Three Ravens: James Smith • 2009

      The artist was inspired by the nature of Whistler and the Valley Trail to recycle bicycle tires in the creation of three raven sculptures. They capture essential elements of Whistler in combining cycling, recycling, wildlife, and the Valley Trail. The artist held a public art event to involve people in the “feathering of the birds”, which involved screwing bicycle tires pieces onto the carved recycled plastic form of the bird body.

      The position of the Ravens at either side of the Valley Trail near the Crabapple Creek bridge at the Whistler Golf Course can be a surprise for some people. Like Ravens, they perch in the trees, waiting for an opportunity.

    • 116: Cycling Salmon: Penny Martyn • 2005

      Part of the Valley Trail series, Cycling Salmon is adjacent to the River of Golden Dreams. The art celebrates life in Whistler, including the spawning of Kokanee near this spot. The artist held a community tile making workshop and the tiles were incorporated into the piece along with her own creations to form the sculpture.

      Periodically, the River of Golden Dreams is filled with spawning Kokanee. Kokanee are Sockeye Salmon that live their whole lives in fresh water. In an epic spawning year the nearby bridge will be filled with people watching the red fury of Kokanee spawning. Visit the Whistler Naturalists’ website for articles on the Kokanee and other Whistler wildlife.

    • 117: Creek Woman: Laurence Knowles • 2005

      This is one of three basalt sculptures in a series located along the Valley Trail in Alpine (public art #117, #118 and #119). The series presents figures and stories from the artist's Haida First Nations culture. Creek Woman is one of the noble women of Earth's creation. She resides by water and presides over fish.

      Artist Laurence Knowles is a stone carver. He was commissioned for his proposal to create sculptures that depict symbols from his First Nation culture. As the artist is from Haida Gwaii, he contacted the area’s Lil’wat First Nation to involve a Lil’wat elder in a blessing ceremony early in the carving process. The blessing was held at Rebagliati Park in Whistler Village, which was the site where Laurence carved the three sculptures. Those fortunate visitors that observed his work and spoke with him learned about his passion for stone carving, his life in the north and his work as an artist.

    • 118: Medicine Man: Laurence Knowles • 2005

      Medicine Man was created to honour the Lil'wat elder that blessed the basalt series at the start of the carving process. Medicine Man is the second in the three-part series (public art #117, #118 and #119). It can be found at the southwest entry to Meadow Park.

      Artist Laurence Knowles is a stone carver. He was commissioned for his proposal to create sculptures that depict symbols from his First Nation culture. As the artist is from Haida Gwaii, he contacted the area’s Lil’wat First Nation to involve a Lil’wat elder in a blessing ceremony early in the carving process. The blessing was held at Rebagliati Park in Whistler Village, which was the site where Laurence carved the three sculptures. Those fortunate visitors that observed his work and spoke with him learned about his passion for stone carving, his life in the north and his work as an artist.

    • 119: Grandfather (Bear): Laurence Knowles • 2005

      This sculpture resides in Meadow Park and was carved in public. Visitors learned of the artist’s passion for stone carving and his life in Haida Gwaii.

      As the name suggests, there is a relationship between human and bear. The black bear is a respected animal and symbol. As the artist explained about his life in the north, hunters would pray to the bear before hunting. The human in the bear’s eye represents the First Nations’ story of transformation.

      The artist chose this location for the bear so that it would be close to, and part of, families playing in the park. To the south a second sculpture, Medicine Man, looks to the bear. Medicine Man was created to honour the Lil’wat First Nation elder that blessed the Basalt Sculpture Project.

    • #151: Nancy Greene Drive Bridge Mural: Kris Kupskay • 2015

      This mural pays tribute to recreational fishing and is painted on the sides and under the bridge, by the trail that runs along the shore of Fitzsimmons Creek.

    • #152: Village Ascent: Oliver Harwood • 2014

      The sculpture is at the junction of trails by the shore of Fitzsimmons Creek. The sculpture is a trail landmark and a tribute to trail builders. A video was produced featuring the artist, scenes from the installation and Oliver’s thoughts on public art. Visit www.whistler.ca/publicart to view the video.

    • 155: World’s Largest Pine Cone: Paul Slipper & Mary-Ann Liu • 2013

      This stone sculpture is a landmark at the junction of Valley Trails leading to Alta Lake Park (200 metres north), Wayside Park (300 metres east) and Nita Lake (300 metres southwest). The basalt sculpture is in the tradition of stone cairn trail markers.

    • Artist Studio: Borgi Rayen

      Borgi Rayen lives and creates in beautiful Whistler, BC. She is inspired by the natural wonders that surrounds her. Jewellery or clay, her style represents a quiet beauty. It started with a part-time hobby and bloomed into a passionate full-time joy.

      everydaypearls.net

    • Artist Studio: Isobel MacLaurin

      Having completed three years of formal art studies in New Brunswick, Isobel MacLaurin has been a working artist all her life. A long term Whistler resident, her murals are on Blackcomb and Whistler Mountains, on the Valley Trail, in several Whistler Parks, at the British Columbia Institute of Technology, in various Burnaby Parks, and at the University of the South Pacific in Fiji and the Cook Islands. Having exhibited in many one man and group shows in Canada, USA and New Zealand, she has received awards in Canadian National Wildlife Art, art exhibits and nature photography.

      Her nature paintings have been on several magazine covers. In 1991, she received the Citizen of the Year Award for the Whistler Chamber of Commerce. Isobel is a charter member of the Whistler Public Arts Committee, the Whistler Arts Council, a trustee of the Whistler Museum and Archives Society, and a long time member of the Federation of Canadian Artists.She has volunteered her artistic talents for many years for the children of Whistler, and recently for the children of an East Vancouver school. At her Alpha Lake studio, Isobel provides art courses to groups by appointment.

    • Artist Studio: Sarah Sladen

      Sass Designs' jewellery is handcrafted by Sarah Sladen. Surrounded by the natural beauty of Whistler BC, Sarah is inspired to create beautiful designs using natural elements from around the world.

      Jewellery that is comfortable for a hike yet dressy enough for a night out. With the multitude of colours, textures and styles available, good luck picking just one!

      sassdesigns.com

    • Artist Studio: Vincent Massey

       Vincent Massey graduated from Farnham Art College, England in 1982 specializing in the traditional English and Japanese methods of stoneware, including firing techniques of wood, salt and raku. Further apprenticeships with exceptional potters in England and Canada helped establish him as a professional artist. In 1985, Vincent built his home on the slopes of Rainbow Mountain in Whistler and established a large pottery studio. Vincent continues to develop the craft of pottery through the adaptation of traditional methods and glazes. Vincent’s work is shipped worldwide and sought out by collectors, hotels and those wishing to enhance their cuisine or dining room with unique yet very practical pieces of pottery. Vincent’s studio is open regularly.

      vincentmasseypottery.com